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11 Free Video Games That Will Develop Your Business & Personal Finance Skills

Written by Brett McKay

I love simulation games. Ever since I played Sim City on the Super Nintendo back in 1990, I’ve been addicted. In fact, I feel simulation games gave me my first lessons in economics. By playing SimCity I learned about taxes, spending, and budgeting. While the real world is a bit more complicated, SimCity gave me a basic understanding.

I still think simulation games have a lot to offer as a way of introducing people to basic financial principles. About.com has put together a nice list of free business simulation games. Play these and you’ll increase your business savvy or at least motivate yourself to become more business savvy. If you think you’re too old or already know enough, have your kids play them. It’s an excellent way to teach your children business and personal finance skills.

  1. Simutrans. The goal of Simutrans is to build a network of railroads and bus connections. Think Railroad Tycoon.
  2. Food Force. The United Nations helped develop Food Force. The object of the game is feed 6 million people on an island in the Indian Ocean. Food Force will help develop budgeting and planning skills.
  3. Lemonade Stand. Lemonade stands are most people’s first introduction to business. Now you can do it online. The object of this game is to make as much profit as possible in 30 days.
  4. Chart Wars. Ever wanted to manage a band? Now you can with Chart Wars. You hire bands, plan road trips, and sell albums. Harness your inner Rick Rubin.
  5. Fantasy Stock Market. The best way to learn about investing is to actually do it. But if you’re afraid of losing money while you’re learning, check out Fantasy Stock Market. It’s online game in which you compete with other investors to see who can develop the best portfolio.
  6. GameBiz. It’s 1983 and you’re video game developer. Try to outperform other well known video game companies like Atari and EA.
  7. Industry Player. This game is played online with other registered players. You start off with a set amount of money to be used to grow a business empire.
  8. MiniMogul. You take the part as movie producer who invests in future movie releases.
  9. Musical Manager 3. It’s the similar to Chart Wars. In this game you’re band manager trying to help your band make it big.
  10. Rich Man Game. Perfect the art of the corporate take over in this massive multiplayer game.
  11. The Second Chance for Mankind. This is very similar to SimCity. You goal is to build a successful metropolitan area.

If you go through all these and still haven’t satisfied your craving for simulation games, you can always play old school SimCity for free.

Massive Resource List for Online Learning

Written by Mrs. FLS

Lifehacker had post on this nifty site, Massive Resource List for All Autodidacts. It’s just a page with different lists of stuff you can lean on the Internet. They have a list for free podcasts of different university lectures. You can learn about economics and U.S foreign policy from a real professor. There’s also a list of places where you can learn a foreign language for free. I also like how they’ve included a list of free useful software for students.

How this can help law students
One thing I’ve learned in law school is that the study of law often touches on other subjects. If a student really wants to understand the law, it’s often useful to be familiar with these subjects. For example, in Constitutional law, history plays a huge role in the development of the law. Background in American history can be extremely useful in understanding Con law. Another example is contracts and property. I wish I would have taken an economics class or two while I was an undergrad. General knowledge about the subject would have come in handy.

Check it out today.